Art of the Orient. Ottoman Turkish Tents

Hours and Tickets

tickets

01 Dec. - 27 Feb.

regular 20 PLN, reduced 15 PLN

Tuesday-Sunday

01 Dec. - 27 Feb.

only 2nd floor, until February 28, 2022

9:30 am-5 pm, last entry 4:20 pm

Permanent exhibition
Art of the Orient. Ottoman Turkish Tents
Through trade contacts and military conflicts magnificent carpets, silks and wall hangings, arms and armor, parade saddles, and other goods from Turkey, the Crimea, the Caucasus, and Iran filtered into the Commonwealth. The most important is of a group of trophies taken during the Battle of Vienna (September 12, 1683)– the sweeping victory of the coalition of European armies commanded by King John III Sobieski of Poland over the Ottoman army led by Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa Pasha. The collection of East Asian porcelain is testimony to 18th-century Europe’s fascination with distant and exotic China and Japan.

The exhibition is located on the second floor of the Castle.
Permanent exhibition
Art of the Orient. Ottoman Turkish Tents
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Permanent exhibition
Second floor
The 17th-century Ottoman two-poled tent—one of the largest in the Wawel Castle collection—is an exceptional blued color. The tent walls are adorned with arcades; amid its rich floral decoration, there are medallions with inscriptions in Arabic script of blessings of happiness and prosperity. The tent is exhibited alongside the blade of a saber traditionally linked to Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa Pasha, the commander of the Ottoman army at Vienna, and two 16th-century Turkish helmets. Displayed inside the tent are Turkish carpets from the 17th and 18th century and a Persian metal basin with inscriptions.
Permanent exhibition
Second floor
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Permanent exhibition
Second floor
Two smaller two-poled tents exhibited on this floor date from the early 18th century and may have been used for travelling or hunting as temporary shelter. Although less opulent, their decorations echo the pattern of the blue tent: arcades filled with medallions and floral decoration. Flowers also appear on the 17th-century Turkish Iznik ceramics and on the carpets from the Kulczycki collection.
Permanent exhibition
Second floor
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Permanent exhibition
Second floor
The magnificent saddle and bridle set with gold and precious stones once belonged to Christoph Leopold Schaffgotsch, an envoy of Leopold I to the court of John III Sobieski. The parade horse equipment and arms was made by the leading craftsmen of Istanbul and is among the most splendid military equipment preserved in the Wawel collection. Also on view are edged weapons and a very specific type of plate and mail armor, called yushmans.
Permanent exhibition
Second floor
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